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Alan Edward Stubbs graduated from University College London with a BSc Geology in 1962 and has since spent his entire career in conservation.  

Alan is the founding father of Buglife. He was formation secretary of Buglife, leading to the opening of the first office in 2002 and Chairman of Buglife from the mid 2000’s until 2012. Alan has helped Buglife expand to its current position by influencing policy and legislation, raising the profile of invertebrates and developing projects to raise the impact of the organisation. 

Alan Stubbs © Buglife

Alan Stubbs © Buglife

 

He is currently a dedicated volunteer offering training and support to both Buglife staff and the general public. 

 

Outside of paid work Alan has also held numerous significant roles in the conservation sector including:

Founder member of Invertebrate Link (Joint Committee for the Conservation of British Insects), Founder member of the National Trust’s Nature Conservation Panel, served on the Conservation Committee of the British Butterfly Conservation Society, Vice President of the Royal Entomological Society, President of the British Entomological Society and Natural History Society, President of the Amateur Entomological Society, organiser of the Cranefly Recording Scheme, Entomological Adviser to Surrey Naturalists' (now Wildlife) Trust and a voluntary leader for The Conservation Corps (now BTCV).

 

Notable achievements:

Alan’s work has been acknowledged with two Marsh awards; the Marsh Award for services to invertebrate conservation from the Royal Entomological Society in 2004 and Marsh Award for Lifetime Achievement in Lepidoptera Conservation in 2008.

 

He has authored and contributed to over 100 publications covering a range of groups and issues, including: British Hoverflies - An Illustrated Identification Guide - the current reference books on British hoverflies and their identification, British Soldierflies and Their Allies: A Field Guide to the Larger British Brachycera the current reference books on British soldierflies and their identification.

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