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Peterborough's Buzzing!

The exciting Peterborough’s Buzzing project transformed mown grassland into colourful, wildflower-rich havens for both people and wildlife.

The Peterborough’s Buzzing project was completed in 2016. Thanks to our work with partners, we have brought wildflowers, colour and pollinators back to 15 sites across the city! An incredible 1,490 volunteer hours helped to make this possible, while thousands of people were engaged with everything from plug planting to bug hunts and scrub clearance to moth trapping! Thanks again for the generous support of HLF and the Cambridgeshire & Peterborough Biodiversity Partnership for helping make Peterborough Buzz.

Getting close to nature © Steven Falk

Getting close to nature © Steven Falk

Buglife worked with local communities, the Nene Park Trust and Peterborough City Council to enhance 10 hectares of grassland across the city.

These vibrant wildflower-rich areas will create vital habitats for a whole range of bugs from bees to moths, and butterflies to spiders. Since the 1940’s, agricultural land cover in Peterborough has increased 60-80%- much at the expense of wildflower-rich habitats.

Peterborough's Buzzing created a network of stunning meadows using native wildflower seed, plug plants and introduced wildlife-friendly management throughout the city to bring colour back to its popular parks and revitalise its open spaces.

Throughout the Nene Park, Peterborough’s Buzzing improved the popular Ferry Meadows Country Park, Orton Mere, Thorpe Meadows and Woodston Reach while work with Peterborough City Council included Holywell Ponds Local Nature Reserve and Thorpe Meadows Recreation Ground.

As well as creating new wildlife habitat, Peterborough’s Buzzing helped to develop exciting new educational opportunities at key learning sites for the city’s schools. A traditional meadow was created with Vivacity at Flag Fen and a new bug friendly garden display area created at the East of England Agricultural Society’s Showground learning barn. Alongside educational interpretation boards, these installations will ensure that children continue to learn about the value of bugs and meadows for years to come.

 

The project was a unique opportunity to bring people closer to wildlife across the city, with a range of events including working with local communities to sow seed and plant wildflower seedlings, and even family moth trapping and bug hunts to see what's moved in!

 

 

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